John Archibald is Coming to Columbus

The 2018 Pulitzer Prize winner for commentary will host a Q&A in the Davidson

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John Archibald is Coming to Columbus

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2018 Pulitzer Prize winner John Archibald will visit Columbus State University on Sept. 18 to host a Q&A in the Davidson, starting at 6 p.m.. Archibald, who has been writing as a columnist for AL.com for the past 14 years, won the prize in the category of commentary “for lyrical and courageous commentary that is rooted in Alabama but has a national resonance in scrutinizing corrupt politicians, championing the rights of women and calling out hypocrisy,” according to Dana Canedy, the administrator of the Pulitzers. Archibald agreed to visit CSU at the request of The Saber.

According to AL.com, Archibald is the third writer working for the company to have won a Pulitzer Prize. Another achievement of his, says the website, is that some of his investigative writing in 2017 led former state lawmaker Oliver Robinson to plead guilty “in a bribery scandal that produced indictments of two attorneys and a coal company executive.” Additionally, AL.com provides a list of other writers who have won the Pulitzer Prize in Commentary, including Peggy Noonan, Thomas Friedman, Connie Schultz, and Jimmy Breslin.

Archibald’s winning work can be viewed on the Pulitzer website, www.pulitzer.org. Headlines from his winning articles include “Her dad has his platform. Brandi Burgess finds her voice,” “Alabama Constitution: We’re not all created equal,” and “Here’s a tale of God, profits, and Roy Moore.” As an example of Archibald’s writing, AL.com provides a passage from his 2017 article, “The world is watching Alabama; what does it see?”

In response to the United States Senate special election in Alabama in 2017, during which Democratic candidate Doug Jones competed against Republican candidate Roy Moore, Archibald wrote, “Thinking of the world watching Alabama right now is like hearing an unexpected knock on the door when you haven’t done the dishes. … The world is watching. And what it sees will have consequences. Vote your heart. Vote your conscience. But know what it means. To the world, and to you.”