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“Love, Death, + Robots”

A NSFW anthology

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“Love, Death, + Robots”

Illustration by Terrance Harris

Illustration by Terrance Harris

Illustration by Terrance Harris

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What do you think love, death, and robots have in common? You might think these three things have no relations to each other, but they do in the newest Netflix series, “Love, Death + Robots.” The series is an adult animated anthology released March 15. The idea for it came from the minds of Joshua Donen, the executive producer, and David Fincher, the director. The series is an homage to other anthologies, mainly “Heavy Metal.” Currently, there are 18 episodes for the first season. Each episode has a different art style made by different casts and crews from around the world. While the series is still animated, some episodes incorporate CGI cell shading and even photorealism. The episodes are stand-alone shorts, each running for about 20 minutes.

 

Episodes

 

“Sonnie’s Edge,” directed by Dave Wilson

In a dystopian London, a woman by the name Sonnie battles in an underground  monster fight coliseum, all to get revenge on those who hurt her.

 

“Three Robots,” directed by Victor Maldonado and Alfredo Torres

On a post-apocalypse Earth, three robots traverse a ruined city for relics in order to expand their limited knowledge of how humans lived.

 

“The Witness,” directed by Alberto Mielgo

A woman witnesses a murder across the street from her apartment, the killer realizing he’s been seen. It is a cat-and-mouse game for the woman attempting to flee from the killer.

 

“Suits,” directed by Franck Balson

A horde of aliens invade a farming community, killing its livestock. The farmers retaliate with mechanical robot suits and fend off the horde.

 

“Sucker of Souls,” directed by Owen Sullivan

A team of archaeologists and mercenaries uncover monsters hidden underground and must fight their way out to survive.

 

“When the Yogurt Took Over,” directed by Victor Maldonado and Alfredo Torres

After a team of scientists experiment on a canister of yogurt, it becomes sentient and takes over the world.

 

“Beyond the Aquila Rift,” directed by Leon Berelle, Dominique Boidin, Remi Kozyra, and Maxime Luere

A space crew runs into trouble when they reawaken from their cryo-sleep. Upon awakening, the captain’s old flame enters the ship, and strange things begin to occur.

 

“Good Hunting,” directed by Oliver Thomas

In Ancient China, a boy meets and befriends a supernatural creature. As time passes, their homeland begins to change into the industrial age.

 

“The Dump,” directed by Javier Recio Gracia

A health and safety inspector makes a visit to the home of an elderly man, which is an actual dump. While the visit is not a pleasant one, the old man tells a story to the inspector that leaves him in shock and awe.

 

“Shape-Shifters,” directed by Gabriele Pennacchioli

Two soldiers with special powers are used as weapons on the front field of war.

 

“Helping Hand,” directed by Jon Yeo

A lone astronaut finds herself in danger when her suit malfunctions, leaving her adrift in space.

 

“Fish Night,” directed by Damian Nenow

Two door-to-door salesmen are stuck in the middle of nowhere. When night falls, they share a fantastic surreal experience.

 

“Lucky 13,” directed by Jerome Chen

A rookie pilot is paired with a ship known for misfortune.

 

“Zima Blue,” directed by Robert Valley

A reporter is on the way to meet with a secluded, world-famous artist. During the trip, she reminisces about the artist’s journey to fame.

 

“Blindspot,” by Vitaliy Shushko

A group of robots are on a heist as they chase down a convoy.

 

“Ice Age,” directed by Tim Miller

A couple moves into a new apartment and finds something peculiar inside their freezer.

 

“Alternate Histories,” directed by Victor Maldonado and Alfredo Torres

An alternate history app called “Multiversity” generates different outcomes of historical events. In the app creators’ demonstration of their app, they choose their most popular request: alternate ways Adolf Hitler could have died.

 

“The Secret War,” directed by István Zorkóczy

A group of Red Army soldiers go out hunting demons who have been terrorizing their lands.

 

Though “Love, Death + Robots” is still new, it has grown a following, attracting new viewers, receiving re-tweets and shares, and getting good reviews from fans. If you have the time, jump into its stories and see what you think.

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